“It made me think in new ways.”

I can’t remember a piece of media thinking I’ve enjoyed as much as Mel’s Sandbox by Melody Joy Kramer. The above is just a line she used her her latest epistle, and I think it captures what I’ve always wanted in my media: To make me think in new ways. It’s why I’ve always hated most columnists and almost all cable commenters, even those I agree with: They don’t expand my world.

The most gratifying, surprising aspect of MuckRock had been discovering amazing people who use the site to explore questions I never even would have thought to ask. They make me think in new ways, and hopefully the community we’re building helps them think in new ways, too.

Anyway, subscribe to Mel’s newsletter.

“It made me think in new ways.”

The real cost of broken FOIA

Besides the anecdotes you got related to nail-salon culture, what’s the most shocking thing you found?
It took me over nine months to get the Labor Department to give me information from their database, which they are legally required to do based on the Freedom of Information laws. And the most shocking thing was how little they go into salons. They have two people who speak Korean. Nobody’s looking.

Via VICE regarding New York Times’ investigation into exploitation at New York City nail salons.

The real cost of broken FOIA

MuckRock’s evolution

MuckRock Abstract Business

Above, a few years of MuckRock usage visualized, showing how we’ve moved from mostly free accounts (yellow) to community (green) and professional (blue) accounts. I find it utterly unhelpful and delightful.

Image

The Walled Garden reapers come to collect their due

Image licensed under Creative Commons by Flickr user Johnson Cameraface.
Image licensed under Creative Commons by Flickr user Johnson Cameraface.

Image licensed under Creative Commons by Flickr user Johnson Cameraface.

It used to be pretty easy to grow an online audience, month-over-month, year-over-year. When I worked managing dozens of bloggers, I even had it down to a rough science: If you write six or more times a month, your audience will almost certainly grow. If you write five or less times a month, your audience almost certainly will decline.

There were exceptions — the truly great and the truly terrible writers could always confound the numbers — but the rule held true for probably 95% of the folks I edited.

But Marco Arment notes something folks are still mostly just whispering about: The days of easy growth are over, and independent blogs might well be the canary in the coal mines.

Via Marco.org:

Shallow social-shareable listicles and clickbait headlines have always been plentiful on the web, but it does seem clear that they’re getting much worse and more dominant recently.

Google is making the problem worse, but they’re not the root problem. In fact, the real problem is a pretty big problem for Google, too:

Everyone’s spending increasingly more consumption time dicking around in apps and snacking on bite-sized social content instead of browsing websites and searching Google.

Publishers are relying more on social traffic not because Google’s squeezing them out, but because that’s where everyone went. The dominance of mobile usage, social networks, and YouTube, plus attention-competition from apps, are the real problems for web publishers and blog writers.

While once the web thrived when sites and services pushed their visitors on to other interesting things, the web is becoming much more a series of walled gardens: Traffic from referrers like news organizations or bloggers will go from little to less, while Facebook, the great traffic driver of the day, is augured by wiser minds to be planning to cut the flow of traffic soon in a bid to keep readers in its own garden.

The Walled Garden reapers come to collect their due